Tic & Obsessive-compulsive Disorders

Tic-Treatment

In the treatment of tics, both pharmacological and behavioral therapeutic approaches are successfully applied. For both forms of intervention evaluation studies with positive results exist. However direct comparative data showing whether and to what extent a pharmacological intervention with tiapride is preferable to the behavioral intervention by Habit reversal training in terms of their short- and long -term efficacy and safety, or vice versa . The aim of the proposed study is therefore to investigate the short-term effects of both forms of therapy for the first time comparatively.

In this study, both affected and healthy children aged 10 to 17 years are examined. In affected individuals, the indication for treatment of their tic disorder should be provided and the choice of therapy is left to the study participants and their parents. The study comprises two EEG dates at intervals of 10 weeks (before and 10 weeks after the successful Tiaprid- or Habit reversal therapy ).

Contact: M. Sc. Psych. Benjamin Bodmer

Research Group: AG Rößner

 

TicGenetics

The aim of this international study is to detect genetic factors that can cause tic disorders and other related psychiatric disorders in certain people. Therefore we want to examine families. It is important that affected (from 3 years of age) as well as healthy family members take part in the study.

Initially during a detailed telephone interview, a  family tree is generated and the number of affected family members is identified. After that you will receive questionnaires to fill out at home. Afterwards an appointment in the University hospital in Dresden will take place. There the questionnaires will be reviewed and blood samples will be taken for the following analysis of genetic markers.      

Contact: M. Sc. Psych. Benjamin Bodmer

Research Group: AG Rößner

For further information click here: Tic-Genetics Informationen.pdf (German)

 

Neurophysiology of cognitive control functions in OCD

The neuro-biological basis of obsessive-compulsive disorders (OCD) is not fully understood yet. Comprehensive research results suggest that cortico-striato-thalamo circuits are affected (Melloni et al., 2012; Menzies et al., 2008; Saxena, Brody, Schwartz, & Baxter, 1998). With regard to the relevance of the cortico-striato-thalamo circuits in OCD the importance of the dopaminergic system for the neuropathology of OCD gets more into focus. Dopamine plays an important role in the modulation of cognitive control. The dopaminergic modulation of cognitive control is based on two antagonistic sub-processes. While stability describes the ability to maintain contents and goals in working memory and shielding them from competing stimuli, flexibility describes the ability to switch between memory contents and goals thus being able to take unexpected information into account (Durstewitz & Seamans, 2008; Goschke, 2000). In order to behave adequately in every-day situations a balance between these two processes which are mediated via different dopaminergic systems is necessary (Cools & D’Esposito, 2010; Durstewitz & Seamans, 2008). Against this backdrop we would like to investigate to what extent OCD involves impairments in cognitive control and anticipatory processes. We would like to investigate neural and behavioral correlates of affected and healthy children and teenagers between the ages of 11-17 years. The study comprises of one appointment for an EEG recording, when also some performance tests as well as some disorder specific pre-tests will be carried out.

Contact: Dr. phil. Nicole Wolff, Dr. rer. nat. Judith Buse

Research Group: AG Rößner